Unlock the Power of "Deep Curiosity" to Open Your Mind, Strengthen Your Relationships, And Navigate Life's Challenges in This Award-Winning Book by Scott Shigeoka

Live With Deep Curiosity To Open Your Mind, Strengthen Your Relationships, And Embark On A Journey of Healing

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Live With Deep Curiosity To Open Your Mind, Strengthen Your Relationships, And Embark On A Journey of Healing

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— Adam Grant

#1 New York Times bestselling author of Think Again and Hidden Potential

Most people recognize the value of curiosity, but few know how to embrace and unleash it. SEEK will help you close the gap between awareness and action. Scott Shigeoka’s thirst for understanding and connection is contagious, and his book is a timely bridge for our divided world.”

— Gretchen Rubin

#1 New York Times bestselling author of The Happiness Project and Life in Five Senses

Energizing, creative, and exciting...Scott Shigeoka is the perfect person to tackle this subject.

— Seth Godin

New York Times bestselling author of The Song of Significance and Tribes

We've been hiding from each other for far too long. Scott's book offers us an empathic, practical and heartfelt road map forward.

— Jud Brewer MD PhD

New York Times bestselling author of Unwinding Anxiety and the director of research and innovation at Brown University’s Mindfulness Center

Grounded in science and stories, Scott's exploration of curiosity is full of energy and wisdom. I have no doubt his methodology will offer a path of healing for many.

— Dacher Keltner PhD

Bestselling author of Awe: The New Science of Everyday Wonder and How it Can Transform Your Life and Professor of Psychology at UC Berkeley

We are all hungering for more curiosity, and there is no more illuminating of a guide to our quest than Scott Shigeoka.

— Ethan Kross PhD

Bestselling author of Chatter and director of the Self-Control and Emotion Laboratory at the University of Michigan

Through wit, wisdom, and science, Scott provides a practical guide to master the art and skill of curiosity—an essential human attribute vital to leadership, flourishing and success.

— Kristin Neff PhD

Bestselling author of Self-Compassion: The Proven Power of Being Kind to Yourself and Fierce Self-Compassion

Scott explores the nature of curiosity and how opening our hearts and minds to the unknown can transform our experiences.

— Adam Smiley Poswolsky

Bestselling author of The Quarter-Life Breakthrough and Friendship in the Age of Loneliness

Scott Shigeoka is one of the world’s leading voices on bridging differences. In our lonely, polarized world, his book SEEK couldn’t come at a better time.

Did you know that curiosity is your superpower? Maximize your capacity for connection, healing, and personal growth with this “timely bridge for our divided world.” (Adam Grant, #1 New York Times bestselling author of Hidden Potential and Think Again)


SEEK will show you how to practice deep curiosity through my signature four-phase "DIVE" model—Detach, Intend, Value, Embrace—so you can build the courage to be transformed by the people, places, and experiences you encounter.

Political blow-ups, vaccine controversy, religious freedom, climate change, gender rights—division, loneliness, and polarization have ripped us apart. Our friendships are strained, teams at work can't find common ground, families are divided, and healing feels out of reach… but it doesn’t have to.
 
Internationally-recognized curiosity expert Scott Shigeoka knows that the radical practice of "Deep Curiosity," rooted in a desire to understand ourselves and others beneath the surface, holds our only path to connection and transformation.

Richly researched and written with electric vulnerability, Seek teaches readers more than a dozen concrete strategies to bring Deep Curiosity into their lives through the "DIVE" model.

Whether you want to save a relationship, improve employee relations, or just find peace at the next family reunion, Seek is a revolutionary toolkit for our most urgent challenges.

READ AN EXCERPT

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SEEK has been awarded many business and non-fiction book prizes including Amazon's Best Book of 2023, Porchlight's Best Business Books of 2023, and a Next Big Idea Club's "Must-Read" (curated by Malcolm Gladwell, Susan Cain, Daniel Pink, and Adam Grant)

Did you know that curiosity is your superpower? Though we often think of being curious as a personality trait, it’s actually the foundation of our capacity for connection, growth, and healing. 


This book will show you how to practice curiosity and reap its benefits.

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The DIVE Model

D
I
V
E

etach — Let go of your ABCs (assumptions, biases, certainty),

ntend — Prepare your mindset and setting,

alue — See the dignity of every person, including yourself,

mbrace — Welcome the hard times in your life

Selected Book Press

WATCH Scott's APPEARANCE on the today show

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• Challenge assumptions and biases
• Provide an antidote to fear and anxiety
• Embrace uncertainty with courage
• Strengthen your relationships
• Become more intentional & thoughtful
• Sharpen your creativity & collaboration
• Find common ground across differences
• Move through hard times in your life
• Build self-awareness
• Be kinder to yourself

The Benefits of Deep Curiosity


ORDER TODAY   >

• Challenge assumptions and biases
• Provide an antidote to fear and anxiety
• Embrace uncertainty with courage
• Deepen your relationships
• Become more intentional & thoughtful
• Sharpen your creativity & collaboration
• Find common ground across differences
• Move through hard times in your life
• Build self-awareness
• Be kinder to yourself

The Benefits of Deep Curiosity

AMAZON

BARNES & NOBLE

BOOKSHOP

BOOKS-A-MILLION

TARGET

• Challenge assumptions and biases
• Provide an antidote to fear and anxiety
• Embrace uncertainty with more courage
• Strengthen your relationships
• Become more intentional and thoughtful
• Sharpen your creativity and collaboration skills
• Find common ground across differences
• Move through hard times in your life
• Build self-awareness and be kinder to yourself

The Benefits of Deep Curiosity

Scott Shigeoka is an internationally recognized curiosity expert, speaker, and the award-winning author of Seek: How Curiosity Can Transform Your Life and Change the World. He is known for popularizing research that promotes positive well-being and relationships, including at UC Berkeley’s Greater Good Science Center and through his groundbreaking courses at the University of Texas at Austin. He has spoken at universities, schools, companies, and conferences around the world. He is also a screenwriter and playwright with two major projects in development. 

About the Author

Scott on LinkedIn

Scott on Instagram

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SPEAKING DECK

Video courtesy of Rally On Media // Photo courtesy of Matt Stomper

Excerpt from SEEK

When I quit my job at a design firm, everyone told me I was out of my mind. I wasn’t darting off to national parks to “find myself” in nature. I wasn’t transitioning to a digital-nomad lifestyle, working beachside or against the backdrop of mountains. Instead, I was leaving my cushy life in San Francisco to spend twelve months on the road, living out of my car, showering at Planet Fitness, and meeting people I’d never normally encounter as a city-dwelling liberal Asian American spiritually queer professor and researcher from Hawai‘i (whew, that’s a mouthful).

Friends told me if I carried out my plans, I’d be targeted with violence or emotional attacks—one said I’d probably get shot. After all, I knew few conservatives or Donald Trump voters; I didn’t have many people in my life who were significantly older or younger than me, outside of my family; I hadn’t met people in rural towns or Indian country; and, although I’d read in the news about people working at farms and factories, I had never connected with anyone who had those occupations.

Instead of wandering aimlessly, I decided to do some prep work to sketch out a route. I had my sights set on a small town in Alabama, an Indigenous reservation in Minnesota, a retreat center where nuns and millennials live together, and a cohort of small business owners in Arkansas. I even planned to cross “enemy lines” to a Trump rally and a Republican meetup, and to have conversations with faith leaders, including one of the country’s most prominent Christian pastors.

Upon hearing about my proposed travels, my friends and family would look at my itinerary, and then they’d look at me. They all ask the same question: Why are you doing this? They were still worried about my safety. But some also told me that going on this trip to meet people on the “other side” would cause harm to people like “us”— progressives, people of color, young folks, and the like.

“Those kinds of people hate us,” one friend said. He encouraged me to pack a knife and pepper spray for protection.

Oddly enough, it was an overwhelming amount of hate that made me pack up my decade-old Prius to the brim (California cliché, I know) and set off on a cross-country road trip in 2019. I wanted to feel less scared and angry all the time. I’ve always lived by the motto “Be driven by love,” and this was a chance to push back on the hate that had seemingly infected the very air we breathed—poisoned by the culture of divisiveness and polarization, of “us versus them,” of disconnection and loneliness. This was a time when our relationships and social fabric were being ripped apart.

It still feels this way today: neighbors screaming at each other at town halls; parents at war at public school hearings; and young people yelling “OK boomer” to elders. In one town, a faith congregation plunges into turmoil after a member comes out as gay; in another, a church and mosque are burned down by arsonists. College campuses and city streets have erupted with identity-based violence, which has been on the rise each year.

The result of all this isn’t just discord and deep sadness on a collective level—it affects us all on a deeply personal one as well. You can’t breathe toxic air like this and not feel it in your own lungs and heart. Friendships and marriages are imploding, family reunions are tense, and a recent study found that one in ten Americans do not have a single close friend. As a country, we are unwilling to look at each other, or even at ourselves, with the kind of compassion and thoughtfulness that would move us toward connection as well as forward in progress. And this isn’t something that afflicts only the United States; these kinds of issues span the entire globe.

I admit I had a personal stake in the journey too. Before the trip, I was researching how to transform our lives for the better at the Greater Good Science Center at the University of California, Berkeley. There, I was compiling research-based strategies that could strengthen our relationships, especially across our differences. This road trip felt like the ultimate field test to put that research into practice. Personally, I still struggled to connect with people who were different from me—erupting into circular arguments or blocking people on social media indefinitely because I disagreed with their views. I felt my critical thinking skills dwindling, falling back on asking more rote questions rather than deep and interesting ones.

While embarking on this journey filled me with fear, there was something far more powerful that kept me going. It didn’t just fuel me—it challenged me to change into a better version of myself. It helped me to make new connections, strengthen old ones, and feel more satisfied and happier with my life. I found a new sense of purpose, felt more creative, and saw possibility in the future, where I’d previously seen despair.

I noticed that this same special sauce that helped me on the road shifted the lives of the many people I met too. It gave Consuelo, a small business owner in Arkansas, the insights and wealth she needed to escape an abusive relationship. It helped Sheila and Glenn, two people who were campaigning in opposition of each other for same-sex marriage legislation, to forge a more collective understanding on a hot-button issue. It brought a group of younger and older spiritual seekers together to nurture a path of friendship.

What was powering all of this connection and transformation was something very special, but also deeply human. Something that is in- side all of us from the time we are born. I reckon that if we can learn how to better harness it, our lives will get better, and it might even change the world:

Curiosity.

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